Table of Relative Working and Physical Properties - Inch-Pound

Relative Working Properties

  • 1 = Fair
  • 2 = Good
  • 3 = Very Good
  • 4 = Excellent
Species
Machining
Resistance to Splitting in Nailing & Screwing
Nail and Screw Holding Ability
Gluing
Douglas-fir
2
3
3
3
Western larch
2
2
3
3
Engelmann spruce
3
4
1
4
Western hemlock
2
3
3
3
Noble fir
2
4
2
4
Grand Fir
2
4
2
4
Subalpine fir
2
4
1
4
Pacific silver fir
2
3
2
4
California red fir
2
4
2
4
Ponderosa pine
3
4
2
3
Western white pine
4
4
2
4
Sugar pine
4
4
2
3
Lodgepole pine
3
3
2
3
White spruce
2
4
2
3
Sitka spruce
3
4
2
4
Alaska yellow-cedar
4
4
2
2
Port-Orford-cedar
4
4
2
2
Incense-cedar
4
4
2
4
Western redcedar
3
3
1
4
Redwood
2
4
2
4
Western juniper
3
3
4
4
Red alder
4
3
3
4
Bigleaf maple
3
3
3
4
Oregon white oak
4
2
4
2
Tanoak
4
2
4
2
Paper birch
4
2
3
2
California black oak
4
2
4
2
Black cottonwood
2
4
1
4
Golden chinkapin
2
3
3
3
Pacific madrone
4
2
4
3
Myrtlewood
3
2
3
4

Sources:
Oregon State University, College of Forestry, Department of Wood Science & Engineering
Wood Handbook: Wood as an Engineering Material (USDA Agricultural Handbook No. 72) Prepared by: U.S. Forest Products Laboratory
Western Wood Products Association and Western Hardwood Association

Physical Properties

Species
Specific Gravity (12% MC)
Avg. Shipping Wt.
(lbs/ft3)
Air dry     Green
% Across the Grain Shinkage (6% MC)
Modulus of Rupture (lbf/in2)
@12% MC
Modulus of Elasticity (X106 lbf/in2)
@12% MC
Side Hardness
(lbf)
@12% MC
Douglas-fir
0.48
34     43
7.6
12400
1.95
710
Western larch
0.52
36    50
9.1
13000
1.87
830
Engelmann spruce
0.35
27     36
7.1
9300
1.30
390
Western hemlock
0.45
31     41
7.8
11300
1.63
540
Noble fir
0.39
26     30
8.3
10700
1.72
410
Grand Fir
0.39
26     47
7.0
8900
1.57
490
Subalpine fir
0.32
28     45
7.5
8600
1.29
350
Pacific silver fir
0.43
27     36
9.2
11000
1.76
430
California red fir
0.38
27     48
7.9
10500
1.50
500
Ponderosa pine
0.40
28     45
6.2
9400
1.29
460
Western white pine
0.38
27     35
7.4
9700
1.46
420
Sugar pine
0.36
25     52
5.6
8200
1.19
380
Lodgepole pine
0.41
29     39
6.7
9400
1.34
480
White spruce
0.36
28     35
8.2
9400
1.43
480
Sitka spruce
0.40
28     33
7.5
10200
1.57
510
Alaska yellow-cedar
0.44
31     36
6.8
11100
1.42
580
Port-Orford-cedar
0.43
29     36
6.9
12700
1.70
630
Incense-cedar
0.37
26     45
5.2
8000
1.04
470
Western redcedar
0.32
23     27
5.0
7500
1.11
350
Redwood
(young growth)
0.35
28     50
4.7
7900
1.10
420
Western juniper
0.44
30    50
4.7
7660
0.89
620
Red alder
0.41
28    46
7.3
9800
1.38
590
Bigleaf maple
0.48
34     47
7.1
10700
1.45
850
Oregon white oak
0.72
50     68
9.0
10300
1.60
1660
Tanoak
0.66
41     62
10.0
16200
1.74
1400
Paper birch
0.55
38     55
9.9
12300
1.59
910
California black oak
0.57
40     72
6.6
8700
0.99
1100
Black cottonwood
0.35
24     46
8.6
8500
1.27
350
Golden chinkapin
0.46
32     61
7.4
10700
1.23
720
Pacific madrone
0.65
45     60
11.9
10400
1.23
1460
Myrtlewood
0.55
39     54
8.1
8000
0.94
1260

Source:
Wood Handbook: Wood as an Engineering Material (USDA Agricultural Handbook No. 72) Prepared by: U.S. Forest Products Laboratory